Historical Childbirth Politics 1820-1980

Note from the author: My original series on Dr. J. Whitridge Williams’ 1914 book “Twilight Sleep: Simple Discoveries in Painless Childbirth” was first posted my me in 2010. I expanded after i saw the movie about the Washington’s Post publication of Pentagon Paper (The Post w/ Tom Hanks) and reposted the expanded series earlier this year. […]

This link will make you laugh and then cry! Check it out … Proposal to bleed 1/5-1/3 of a baby’s blood within 4-24 hours of birth in order to reduce neonatal jaundice Backstory: How the routine use of general anesthesia triggered a race to ‘clamp-it-quick’ cord-cutting For nearly a hundred years — most of the […]

Historical Dissatisfaction with “Standard” (i.e. interventive) Obstetrics for Healthy women-normal pregnancies ~ 1950 – 1960

by faithgibson July 21, 2018

Public dissatisfaction in 1950s with half a century of highly-medicalized and invasive “Knock’em-out, Drag’em-out” obstetrics ~ Push-back by public opinion that rejects information about normalizing normal childbirth ~   Public dissatisfaction with childbirth practices first came to light in mid-1950s, when a popular women’s magazine published a ‘whistle-blower’ article by a Labor and Delivery nurse. As […]

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XYZ Dr. J. Whitridge Williams imaginary 1st person narrative of his “Plan” ~1914 Book “Twilight Sleep”

by faithgibson April 2, 2018

Dr. J. W. Williams explains is own Plan — the story I call the “Dark Side of the moon: I can imagine Dr. J. Whitridge Williams, as the former chief of obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University Hospital and current Dean of its world-famous medical school, having a sudden moment of inspiration in which the answer to his […]

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Dr. J. Whitridge Williams’ Little Book & the Pentagon Papers: Part 6 Numbers don’t lie

by faithgibson March 31, 2018

https://tinyurl.com/yaw5795v Dr. JWW’s story goes on but unfortunately for him, the numbers don’t lie! Generally, American obstetricians were well aware that Sweden had remarkably superior maternal-infant outcomes, so much so that one of the early influential leaders in obstetrical medicine (Dr. George Kosmak) went to Sweden to study their system. When Dr. Kosmak returned from […]

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